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I am a recruiter, but I’m not a Jack of all trades recruiter. Please don’t be offended if I can’t help you in certain fields.

I work in recruitment, I have done for some time now. In the past year, I have freelanced in recruitment and from August last year, I set up my own recruitment agency specialising in fields that I have worked in over the past 8 years and know well; social media and digital marketing.

The funny thing is, when you say you work in recruitment, whether that’s to family, friends, people down the pub or just about anyone, people generally assume that means all types of recruitment. Even if you shout if from the rooftops that you specialise in a field, they’ll ignore that and think you can recruit for anyone and everyone. Earlier today, I got a text from a friend who’s mum is looking for a new job. Tired of the same ritual at her current position in a bank, she’s looking for a new job in either retail or something that she can really get her teeth into, so she thought of me, why not, that’s what I do, don’t I? Recruit people for companies and agencies, so why not help her mum find a new job, because she’s been there 9 years and she thought of me.

See, I’d love to help, by Joe, I really would love to help, but it’s not my forte, specialising in a field, that I once worked in many many moons ago and something I can’t take my time away from what I actually do work in. Us recruiters all specialise in a certain field. There are some of us, who have the experience to work across multiple arenas due to the experience they’ve gained over a number of years, but most of the time, you’ll find agencies will actually do this and have specialist teams who recruit across different roles, fields, titles and so on.

When I started up my agency, my mum got super-excited when I showed her my business cards (saying that, she’s kept every single one since I first stepped foot in the industry all of 8 years ago) and happily shared them to her colleagues, her clients (she’s a hairdresser) and pretty much anyone who asks her how her girls are getting on. My whole family have a few each, just in case, someone they’ll probably never meet, will be looking for a new job in the field. But neglects to mention, the two most important aspects of my agency – social and digital. Granted, she knows little of this industry. Actually, nothing about it. She knows what Facebook is, has heard of Twitter, thinks LinkedIn is a word I made up and Google+ is something to do with something with Google, because it has the word Google in it. Apart from that, she’s a little oblivious to the whole understanding of what it is that I actually do. But that’s the same as my last role, before doing this, Community Management – she thought I just mucked around on Facebook all day- saying that, majority of my friends thought I did that too! Thanks guys!

Back to my original point. I would love to help everyone. I’m a helpful person and do try to help as much as I can, but sometimes there are things I can’t help people with, and this includes certain areas of recruitment. If I had more time in the day, had a small army to take on other industries on top of the ones we work with, then yes, by all means, I would love to help, but I don’t. I understand your frustration, because all you see is the word *recruiter* but I can’t help anymore than what it is I do best.

Thanks for thinking of me, I will try and help find the right person to help you or recommend you to someone who can try and help to. Just don’t hate some of us because we can’t help. It’s nothing personal, just we’re not qualified in that area, but we’ll try our almighty best to find someone who can help you.

 

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More roles coming in thick and fast…

I’ve got some great new roles coming in looking for someone like you to fill them, yes, you.

I have these active roles at the moment, if you’re interested in any of them, get in touch:

  • Sales and Marketing Executive – leading multi-platform agency in Covent Garden [3-5 years experience] £25-30k + uncapped commission
  • Community Manager – fun social media agency in Farringdon [2-3 years experience] £25-30k basic
  • Digital Account Manager x 2 – fab social media agency in Farringdon [3-4 years experience] £30-35k
  • Digital Account Manager – creative social media agency in Kingston [3-5 years experience] £30-35k
  • Senior Digital Account Manager/AD – creative social media consultancy in Kingston [6+ years exp] £40-45k
  • Social Media Account Manager – creative social media consultancy in Kingston [2-4 years exp] £30-35k
  • Social Media Content Manager – digital agency near Goodge St [2-3 years exp] £180-250p.d

These are amongst some of the others coming on each day, so if you’re interested or know some one who is, please get in touch.

 

You know you want to.

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I hate time-wasting recruiters

Why do some recruiters call you up to tell you about a fantastic opportunity, when really all they want is your details to spam the shit out of your inbox at a later date? What’s the point? I don’t see the point, do you? I’m a recruiter, if I have a job for you, I’ll get in touch, if I don’t, I’d rather be honest with you and let you know what I do and don’t have, and if I can’t help you, I’ll forward you to someone who might be able to instead.

It really gets my goat, when cowboy recruiters feel the need to get in touch and give their sales pitch about that awesome job down in who-gives-a-crap-place, paying up to £40k, that is soooo perfect for you, but really it’s a con, there is nothing, apart from, ‘you must come in and register with us with your passport, your driving license, your goldfish’s date of birth and sign these documents that make you our property for ever *cue evil laugh*.’ No.

Don’t waste my time. I hate it. Waste my time, you go into the blocked calls zone on my phone. And don’t ask me to connect on LinkedIn, only to want to gain access to my connections.

I don’t want to time waste my candidates either. I don’t see the point. I’m new setting up by myself, so although I have roles across the industry, I don’t have as many as a recruitment agency might do. I’m slowly building up my network of candidates and clients, but it’s just me, so although I work 14 hours a day, am available all the time on the phone, or email or Twitter or Facebook or LinkedIn, it is just me, no resourcer [yet], so if I don’t have something, I’ll tell you. I’m an upfront, straight to the top, a chatty, fun recruiter who builds on good relationships with my candidates and clients.

If you disagree and think I’ve been crap, feel free to comment.

 

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Stop Cancelling At The Last Minute

It really fucks me off when people cancel at the last minute. Even worse, when there is no reason to. If an emergency has come up or something pretty serious with work is in the spotlight, then fine, I understand but don’t cancel at the last last minute, you know like, 2 minutes before, because you just felt like it.

It’s not on. It’s plain bloody rude.

I don’t know why people feel the need to do it. If you’re not coming, give me some sort of heads up and let me know. I’d appreciate the honesty. Don’t waste my time. I hate time wasters, and I bloody hate being taken for a ride. If you want my help, I’ll help you, if you want to have a laugh and a joke, go to a comedy club.

I’m sure it’s happen to you before, so I doubt you’d like it, so please don’t be one of those people and take the absolute mick and not bother. In this day and age, you know, with technology, we can contact people via text, phone, email or social network to let them know about pretty much anything, and that includes the message ”I can’t come.” I’d rather see that and know not to waste a journey that to be stood up in a coffee shop, waiting for you to show, only to be sat alone, looking like an over-eager meerkat scanning the door every time someone walks in.

I’m a recruiter. I’m your recruiter. I’ll be upfront and honest with you, and I expect the same. I don’t want to run around chasing after you all the time. This is a working relationship that works both ways. I work from home, in West London and don’t frequent Central London that much but when I do, because I know of good talent, I come and visit and see good talent, when I see it.

In future, if you can’t make it, just let me know, even giving me 30 minutes notice, is better for me than none at all. It’s important to have a good professional relationship, so let’s keep each other on the good books, yeah?

Great.

 

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Recruiters please take note

For anyone who is in recruitment and wants to headhunt someone, here’s some rules..

1) Actually READ that person’s CV PROPERLY. You have eyes in your head, use them.
2) Don’t brief a person for something they clearly do not want to do.
3) Ramble. We’re not here to listen to your constant blabber – get to the point or get off my phone line.
4) Get arssy when they say, they’re not looking for a new job.
5) Insist on getting hold of that person’s contacts. I don’t know you, therefore I won’t pass on the details of my friends.
6) Insist your ‘refer a friend’ is better than anyone elses… a few beers won’t make you my new best friend.

Some recruiters really baffle me.

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How to overcome nerves for an interview

Anyone who has ever been on the a job search understands the roller coaster of feelings they feel on the day. Some remain calm on their commute and before they get there, but then freak out when they arrive. Others channel their inner Eminem and lose themselves ‘His palms are sweaty, knees weak, arms are heavy… He’s nervous, but on the surface he looks calm… But he keeps on forgetting what he wrote down….He opens his mouth, but the words won’t come out.’

Sweaty palms, dry and raspy throat and butterflies in the stomach. If that’s how you usually feel before an interview, take heart in the fact that you’re not alone. I’ve felt it plenty of times even if it’s a phone interview and a lot of people do, they may not admit it but plenty of candidates I’ve spoken to in the past have said they’ve felt anxious, sick, nervous when they go to an interview. If you’re feeling nervous, anxious, have those sweaty palms, you’re more likely to forget what you’re supposed to say which dramatically reduces your chances to make it to the final list.

Here are some reasons why we get nervous before an interview: 

  • It’s scary and uncomfortable being judged.
  • It’s scary and uncomfortable being the focus and having to come up with good answers for whatever they ask you.
  • You don’t know what they’re going to ask.
  • You don’t know for sure if what you say is a good answer.
  • You don’t like talking about yourself.
  • You don’t feel comfortable “selling” yourself.
  • You don’t interview every day and so you aren’t sure you know how to do it well.
  • You really need a job.
  • You worry that if you don’t get this job there may not be another chance any time soon.
  • You worry that you’ll sound stupid.
  • You worry there’s something about you or your background they’ll hate.
  • You have no idea exactly what they’re looking for.
  • You hate the idea of being rejected based on just one short meeting.
  • You think you have to be more than you are.

Is there any I’ve missed out?

So take a deep breath with me… breathe in… 1,2,3. Now breathe out and follow these top ways to get over interview anxiety:

Research research research

Do your homework. You might not be taking an exam, but know your stuff will get you further than most. Research on the company, the role, their culture, the person who is interviewing you. Research everything. HR heads say an unprepared candidate starts to fumble and stutter, and appears more anxious when asked questions about the industry and how the company is performing. You can get the latest news from the company’s annual report, its website, press releases, and of course the internet.LinkedIn is a great tool for finding out everything you need to know about a company. Most companies have their profile up on LinkedIn too helping your search that all the more easier. If you’re going for a role in social media, don’t forget to research them up on social media channels including Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn etc. Knowing your research impresses the interviewer and shows you’re interested in the role.

Rehearse your answers

Ask a family member, your partner or friend to help you with the kind of questions you will be answering. There are always some stock questions applicants face during interviews — Tell us something about yourself; Why do you want to change your job; how do you see yourself growing in this organisation; what are your strengths and weaknesses and such. It pays to rehearse the answers either in front of the mirror, or with someone else. Friends and family are great sources of help when preparing for an interview. They’ll tell you if you’re talking too fast, if you’re repeating yourself or talking too much. Practice makes perfect.

First impressions count 

The first 30 seconds of an interview is the most important. Remember dress for success, presentation of yourself is very important, the way you shake the interviewer’s hand and your posture all reflect your presentation. From there, the next 5-7 minutes are just as vital. Be extremely careful in what you say, how you conduct yourself and what impression you allow the interviewer to form of you.

Remember interview hygiene

I’m not saying you have B.O or that you dress inappropriately but along with first impressions count, keep this in mind. Follow some basic interview hygiene rules. Dress neatly and don’t look tired and sweaty. This will boost your confidence. Never look sleepy or stare at the interviewer. If you’re a smoker, try to avoid smoking 30 minutes before you go into an interview. Chewing gum and dousing yourself in perfume will only disguise the smell of lingering ashtray for 10-15 minutes. Keep the fags at bay till after your interview, then smoke to your heart’s content.*

Leave being desperate to desperate Dan

If you know your comic’s, you would know Desperate Dan is a wild west character in the British comic The Dandy. Please please please don’t appear desperate in a job. Be keen, by Jo be keen but don’t be desperate. When you want something too much, you get more nervous. Interviews should be seen as an opportunity to meet and interact with new people, and not as a do-or-die situation.

Remember to ask questions

When you’ve done your research, you may have come across some questions you want to ask the interviewer. Questions are also signs you’re keen on the role. If you can’t think of them off the top of your head, don’t panic, bring with you a notepad and pen and write down your questions. Keep that notepad as your security blanket..

Remember to keep calm. You’re be fabulous.

*I am in no way condoning or promoting smoking.