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I am a recruiter, but I’m not a Jack of all trades recruiter. Please don’t be offended if I can’t help you in certain fields.

I work in recruitment, I have done for some time now. In the past year, I have freelanced in recruitment and from August last year, I set up my own recruitment agency specialising in fields that I have worked in over the past 8 years and know well; social media and digital marketing.

The funny thing is, when you say you work in recruitment, whether that’s to family, friends, people down the pub or just about anyone, people generally assume that means all types of recruitment. Even if you shout if from the rooftops that you specialise in a field, they’ll ignore that and think you can recruit for anyone and everyone. Earlier today, I got a text from a friend who’s mum is looking for a new job. Tired of the same ritual at her current position in a bank, she’s looking for a new job in either retail or something that she can really get her teeth into, so she thought of me, why not, that’s what I do, don’t I? Recruit people for companies and agencies, so why not help her mum find a new job, because she’s been there 9 years and she thought of me.

See, I’d love to help, by Joe, I really would love to help, but it’s not my forte, specialising in a field, that I once worked in many many moons ago and something I can’t take my time away from what I actually do work in. Us recruiters all specialise in a certain field. There are some of us, who have the experience to work across multiple arenas due to the experience they’ve gained over a number of years, but most of the time, you’ll find agencies will actually do this and have specialist teams who recruit across different roles, fields, titles and so on.

When I started up my agency, my mum got super-excited when I showed her my business cards (saying that, she’s kept every single one since I first stepped foot in the industry all of 8 years ago) and happily shared them to her colleagues, her clients (she’s a hairdresser) and pretty much anyone who asks her how her girls are getting on. My whole family have a few each, just in case, someone they’ll probably never meet, will be looking for a new job in the field. But neglects to mention, the two most important aspects of my agency – social and digital. Granted, she knows little of this industry. Actually, nothing about it. She knows what Facebook is, has heard of Twitter, thinks LinkedIn is a word I made up and Google+ is something to do with something with Google, because it has the word Google in it. Apart from that, she’s a little oblivious to the whole understanding of what it is that I actually do. But that’s the same as my last role, before doing this, Community Management – she thought I just mucked around on Facebook all day- saying that, majority of my friends thought I did that too! Thanks guys!

Back to my original point. I would love to help everyone. I’m a helpful person and do try to help as much as I can, but sometimes there are things I can’t help people with, and this includes certain areas of recruitment. If I had more time in the day, had a small army to take on other industries on top of the ones we work with, then yes, by all means, I would love to help, but I don’t. I understand your frustration, because all you see is the word *recruiter* but I can’t help anymore than what it is I do best.

Thanks for thinking of me, I will try and help find the right person to help you or recommend you to someone who can try and help to. Just don’t hate some of us because we can’t help. It’s nothing personal, just we’re not qualified in that area, but we’ll try our almighty best to find someone who can help you.

 

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More roles coming in thick and fast…

I’ve got some great new roles coming in looking for someone like you to fill them, yes, you.

I have these active roles at the moment, if you’re interested in any of them, get in touch:

  • Sales and Marketing Executive – leading multi-platform agency in Covent Garden [3-5 years experience] £25-30k + uncapped commission
  • Community Manager – fun social media agency in Farringdon [2-3 years experience] £25-30k basic
  • Digital Account Manager x 2 – fab social media agency in Farringdon [3-4 years experience] £30-35k
  • Digital Account Manager – creative social media agency in Kingston [3-5 years experience] £30-35k
  • Senior Digital Account Manager/AD – creative social media consultancy in Kingston [6+ years exp] £40-45k
  • Social Media Account Manager – creative social media consultancy in Kingston [2-4 years exp] £30-35k
  • Social Media Content Manager – digital agency near Goodge St [2-3 years exp] £180-250p.d

These are amongst some of the others coming on each day, so if you’re interested or know some one who is, please get in touch.

 

You know you want to.

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I hate time-wasting recruiters

Why do some recruiters call you up to tell you about a fantastic opportunity, when really all they want is your details to spam the shit out of your inbox at a later date? What’s the point? I don’t see the point, do you? I’m a recruiter, if I have a job for you, I’ll get in touch, if I don’t, I’d rather be honest with you and let you know what I do and don’t have, and if I can’t help you, I’ll forward you to someone who might be able to instead.

It really gets my goat, when cowboy recruiters feel the need to get in touch and give their sales pitch about that awesome job down in who-gives-a-crap-place, paying up to £40k, that is soooo perfect for you, but really it’s a con, there is nothing, apart from, ‘you must come in and register with us with your passport, your driving license, your goldfish’s date of birth and sign these documents that make you our property for ever *cue evil laugh*.’ No.

Don’t waste my time. I hate it. Waste my time, you go into the blocked calls zone on my phone. And don’t ask me to connect on LinkedIn, only to want to gain access to my connections.

I don’t want to time waste my candidates either. I don’t see the point. I’m new setting up by myself, so although I have roles across the industry, I don’t have as many as a recruitment agency might do. I’m slowly building up my network of candidates and clients, but it’s just me, so although I work 14 hours a day, am available all the time on the phone, or email or Twitter or Facebook or LinkedIn, it is just me, no resourcer [yet], so if I don’t have something, I’ll tell you. I’m an upfront, straight to the top, a chatty, fun recruiter who builds on good relationships with my candidates and clients.

If you disagree and think I’ve been crap, feel free to comment.

 

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Recruiters please take note

For anyone who is in recruitment and wants to headhunt someone, here’s some rules..

1) Actually READ that person’s CV PROPERLY. You have eyes in your head, use them.
2) Don’t brief a person for something they clearly do not want to do.
3) Ramble. We’re not here to listen to your constant blabber – get to the point or get off my phone line.
4) Get arssy when they say, they’re not looking for a new job.
5) Insist on getting hold of that person’s contacts. I don’t know you, therefore I won’t pass on the details of my friends.
6) Insist your ‘refer a friend’ is better than anyone elses… a few beers won’t make you my new best friend.

Some recruiters really baffle me.

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Twitter on paper [infographic]

The online microblogging social network has no doubt become a huge part of our society. Since being created back in 2006, the service rapidly gained worldwide popularity, with over 500 million registered users as of 2012, generating over 340 million tweets daily and handling over 1.6 billionsearch queries per day. It’s part of a lot of people’s lives, including mine and the numbers are staggering. Here’s a great infographic showing Twitter on paper.

[Source: http://gobieta.com]

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Do you lie on your CV? You won’t believe the amount of people who do… [Infographic]

Last year 25,000 people were asked to participate in a survey about finding a job and employment. Of those 25k people, 20% admitted they would lie on their CV if it meant they could impress a future boss.

Tony Wilmot, founder of Staffbay, which conducted the survey, said:

Obviously, these figures are shocking, but with as many as 80 people chasing the same job it’s hardly surprising that some jobseekers are prepared to bend the rules a little to enter the world of work. 

It’s pleasing to see that 80% of the jobseekers we surveyed are honest, but what is very apparent from these results is the need for those seeking work to differentiate themselves.

Simple paper CVs just don’t make you stand out from the crowd these days; what employers want to do is find out more about job applicants before they call them in for an interview, and they simply can’t do this by flicking through a paper CV.

People lie on their CV for a number of reasons but mostly it’s to impress their new employer, but wouldn’t you want to do well within your new position or would falling flat on your face seem far more appropriate? Making simple mistakes and being oblivious to your industry’s jargon are telltale signs of a deceptive resume. With the job market how it is though, more and more people are taking extreme measures to ensure employment. Lying about degrees, past positions and inflating previous salaries are prime examples.

Fortunately LinkedIn adds hope of crossing off those who like to tell fibs on their CV. Due to your connections online, the world and it’s nan can see your CV displayed to the world from your work experience, your skills and your recommendations. All of these real recommendations and endorsements are there for future employers to see and if they needed to be contacted, any lying boo boo’s you’ve done on your CV can catch you out quicker than Jerry outsmarts Tom. It’s worldly known recruiters and employers should use LinkedIn in their candidate search and this great infographic shows that honestly really is the best medicine..